Work Ethics for Tennessee Food Jobs

Tennessee Food JobsIn Memphis, the unemployment rate reached its peak in 2009 when it rose to 10.5%. Although it decreased to 8.3% last year, it rose to 9.5% this May. Thus, getting hired in this economy is a tedious and excruciating pursuit. Majority of job seekers end up with a job which they are either overqualified to be on or the nature of the job itself is far from the field they chose in school. What is worse is that the competition never stops. People will still be competing for your position even when it is taken. The key to keeping your job is a strong work ethic in the office.

When you are working for food jobs in Memphis, Tennessee, certain factors come together that make up a strong work ethic. These principles are vital in the maintenance of the company’s success and your advancement in your career ladder.

1. Go beyond what is expected from you.

The usual mind set of a normal employee is to go in the office, get the job done at bare minimum and they call it a day. Generally, this is not bad. I does not matter as long as you are doing what is required from you. But this will not make you indispensable for food jobs in Memphis. When lay-off are needed, your employers will not have reasons not to let you go. They would dismiss your loss as replaceable with someone new who has much more to offer. So do the best you can.

Some employees gives you the impression that they are busy when they are not. As much as possible, avoid unnecessary detours at work like a pal chatting about the baseball game last week, a girlfriend asking you on Facebook about the new dress on display, your buddy confirming the poker night this weekend, your office-mate blabbing about her hot date last night during your bathroom break, etc. These and similar conversations can wait until the end of the day. Think about how you can spend the time more productive. Manage the deadline you have set for yourself and stick with it. If you have to come in early or work late, do it. The key to success for food jobs in Memphis, Tennessee is not to simply look busy but to actually get the work done.

2. Be discreet and work as a team

Human nature brings about competition. It is natural for employees to be competitive but control is what separates us from other family of animals, thereby allowing us to be discreet in a professional environment. Have you ever experienced replacing someone who you felt had different working style than you have? This person may have transferred to a different department and you feel like you need to get the team’s loyalty on your side. A part of you would want to announce to the whole office that he or she was incompetent and that you are more qualified for the job. Do not be that person. Whatever your issues are, take it up with the right person. Internal problems should be kept private especially if you are with the management.

Food jobs in Memphis require that you must be a team player. Even when you are sharing the same task with other people, take the effort to earn your own share. Do not depend on others to complete the job. Avoid counting how much work you have done more than the other. The objective is for your company’s success and not your individual pursuit to impress the boss.

Another is to avoid being too conscious about your position. Some employees think too superior over their colleagues and become ineffective as a leader. Relying on job titles do not get the job done. Pointing on other people’s mistakes for your credit do not only created unwanted pit stops but it also create unwarranted hitches towards the destination.

Nonetheless, when applying or working for Tennessee food jobs, establishing a strong work ethics is crucial for job security. Your skills and experience can be easily replaced by someone better. But your value to the company will be priceless.

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